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File #: 22-128    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
File created: 2/4/2022 Departments: BOARD OF SUPERVISORS DISTRICT 4
On agenda: 2/22/2022 Final action: 2/22/2022
Title: Adopt an ordinance adding Section 2.10.090 of Chapter 2.10 and Section 2.14.110 of Chapter 2.14 of Title 2 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code authorizing the use of the titles "County Executive Officer" and "County Attorney," previously introduced on February 8, 2022, and waive reading of the ordinance in its entirety.
Sponsors: Don Horsley, Warren Slocum
Attachments: 1. 20220222_o_Change of Titles.pdf
Special Notice / Hearing: N/A
Vote Required: Majority

To: Honorable Board of Supervisors

From: Supervisor Warren Slocum, District 4
Supervisor Don Horsley, District 3

Subject: Authorization to use alternate titles "County Executive Officer" and "County Attorney"

RECOMMENDATION:
title
Adopt an ordinance adding Section 2.10.090 of Chapter 2.10 and Section 2.14.110 of Chapter 2.14 of Title 2 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code authorizing the use of the titles "County Executive Officer" and "County Attorney," previously introduced on February 8, 2022, and waive reading of the ordinance in its entirety.

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BACKGROUND:
The title of the County's chief administrative officer is currently "County Manager," as set forth in Ordinance Code Chapter 2.10. However, the County Manager title has become outdated and does not allow members of the public to quickly understand the duties of the position. Throughout the Bay Area, other clearer titles are used, including County Administrator and County Executive Officer.

The County Counsel provides legal advice and representation to the Board of Supervisors, County departments, and various other public offices and agencies, as set forth in Ordinance Code Chapter 2.14. While the title "County Counsel" is used throughout California, it is rarely used in other states throughout the nation, and the title "County Attorney" is used for similar positions in the vast majority of states. Similarly, attorneys for cities and towns are most often referred to as "city attorneys" or "town attorneys," and the term "County Attorney" would provide consistency that would aid in public understanding of the role. In addition, the term "counsel" is frequently mistaken for "council," which typically refers to an elected or appointed legislative or advisory body in the government context. In contrast, "attorney" is unambiguous and clear.

DISCUSSION:
Adoption of the ordinance would allow the County Manager and County Cou...

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