San Mateo County Logo
Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Bookmark and Share
File #: 20-588    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
File created: 6/30/2020 Departments: BOARD OF SUPERVISORS DISTRICT 2
On agenda: 8/4/2020 Final action: 8/4/2020
Title: Adopt an ordinance amending Sections 3.68.090, 3.69.070, 5.44.050 and 6.04.040 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code to remove references to the term "Handicapped Persons" in favor of the term "Persons with Disabilities," previously introduced on July 21, 2020, and waive of the reading of the ordinance in its entirety.
Sponsors: Carole Groom
Attachments: 1. 20200804_o_Ordinance re People First Language (Clean).pdf
Special Notice / Hearing: None__
Vote Required: Majority

To: Honorable Board of Supervisors
From: Supervisor Carole Groom, District 2
Subject: Ordinance Amending Sections 3.68.090, 3.69.070, 5.44.050 and 6.04.040 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code to Remove References to the Term "Handicapped Persons" In Favor of The Term "Persons with Disabilities"

RECOMMENDATION:
title
Adopt an ordinance amending Sections 3.68.090, 3.69.070, 5.44.050 and 6.04.040 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code to remove references to the term "Handicapped Persons" in favor of the term "Persons with Disabilities," previously introduced on July 21, 2020, and waive of the reading of the ordinance in its entirety.

body
BACKGROUND:
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported that approximately sixty-one million adults in the United States (i.e., 26% of the adult population), report having a disability. In San Mateo County, this is approximately 143,000 residents. Most Americans will experience a disability some time during the course of their lives.

According to the CDC, "people first" language should be used to speak appropriately and respectfully about an individual with a disability. People first language emphasizes the person first not the disability, and conveys the understanding that people are more than their disabilities. For example, when referring to a person with a disability, refer to the person first by using phrases such as: "a person who...," "a person with...," or a person who has.." Language to avoid includes such terms as "the disabled," "handicapped," or "special needs person." The CDC recommends avoiding language that implies that people with disabilities have limitations, deserve pity or are characterized only by their disabilities.

DISCUSSION:
This ordinance amends several sections of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code to change the terms used from "handicapped persons" to "persons with a disability" in acc...

Click here for full text