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File #: 19-1255    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
File created: 12/10/2019 Departments: PLANNING AND BUILDING
On agenda: 1/7/2020 Final action: 1/7/2020
Title: Adopt an ordinance repealing the 2016 California Building Standards Code with all local amendments, Division VII, and Chapter 3.84 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code; and adopting the latest editions of the 2019 California Building Standards Code: 2019 California Building Code, Title 24, Part 2; 2019 California Residential Code, Title 24, Part 2.5; 2019 California Fire Code, Title 24, Part 9; 2019 California Historical Building Code, Title 24, Part 8; 2019 California Existing Building Code, Title 24, Part 10; 2019 California Mechanical Code, Title 24, Part 4; 2019 California Electrical Code, Title 24, Part 3; 2019 California Plumbing Code, Title 24, Part 5; 2019 California Energy Code, Title 24, Part 6; 2019 California Green Building Standards Code, Title 24, Part 11; 2018 International Property Maintenance Code; 2019 California Reference Standards Code, Title 24, Part 12; and adopting a new Division VII (Building Regulations) of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code, previously intr...
Attachments: 1. 20200107_es_Executive Summary - Building regs ordinance, 2. 20200107_o_2019 Building Regs

 

Special Notice / Hearing:                         None__

      Vote Required:                         Majority

 

To:                      Honorable Board of Supervisors

From:                      Steve Monowitz, Community Development Director

Subject:                      Adoption of the 2019 California Building Standards Code and Amending the San Mateo County Ordinance Code, Division VII (Building Regulations)

 

RECOMMENDATION:

title

Adopt an ordinance repealing the 2016 California Building Standards Code with all local amendments, Division VII, and Chapter 3.84 of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code; and adopting the latest editions of the 2019 California Building Standards Code: 2019 California Building Code, Title 24, Part 2; 2019 California Residential Code, Title 24, Part 2.5; 2019 California Fire Code, Title 24, Part 9; 2019 California Historical Building Code, Title 24, Part 8; 2019 California Existing Building Code, Title 24, Part 10; 2019 California Mechanical Code, Title 24, Part 4; 2019 California Electrical Code, Title 24, Part 3; 2019 California Plumbing Code, Title 24, Part 5; 2019 California Energy Code, Title 24, Part 6; 2019 California Green Building Standards Code, Title 24, Part 11; 2018 International Property Maintenance Code; 2019 California Reference Standards Code, Title 24, Part 12; and adopting a new Division VII (Building Regulations) of the San Mateo County Ordinance Code, previously introduced on December 10, 2019, and waive the reading of the ordinance in its entirety.

 

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BACKGROUND:

Proposal:  The Planning and Building Department proposes the adoption of the 2019 California Building Standards Code pursuant to State law, and corresponding amendments to the San Mateo County Ordinance Code, Division VII (Building Regulations), in addition to local amendments to the California Building Standards Code to address specific concerns within unincorporated San Mateo County.

 

State Code Requirements:  The California Building Standards Commission has adopted the 2019 California Building Code(s) based on the International Building Code (IBC), International Residential Code (IRC), International Fire Code (IFC), International Existing Building Code (IEBC), Uniform Mechanical Code (UMC), Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC), National Electrical Code (NEC). Construction Codes are published and adopted by the State of California on 3-year cycles. The International Code Council (ICC) and the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) develop construction and public safety codes on a triennial basis. This system of code development has provided the citizens of the United States the highest level of safety in the world for more than 90 years. The most recent adoption of standards by the State was the 2019 Edition of the California Building Standards Code, which is based on the new model codes of the International Code Council and International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials.

 

Local jurisdictions are required to enforce these regulations as adopted by the State. However, a city, county, or city and county may establish more restrictive building standards deemed reasonably necessary because of local climatic, geological or topographical conditions. The Planning and Building Department (the Department) is currently proposing local standards that continue amendments adopted in the previous update cycle, as discussed below.  The Department is also working with the Office of Sustainability and with County and local fire departments to propose additional amendments that will increase energy efficiency, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and provide greater fire safety (collectively referred to as “reach codes”), which will be presented to the Board in early 2020.

 

DISCUSSION:

Included below is a description of amendments to specific sections of the California Building Standards Code adopted during the last update cycle and proposed to be continued that address San Mateo County-specific issues.

 

Local jurisdictions are required to re-adopt local amendments every three years when the State adopts new building codes. A local jurisdiction must approve findings showing local climatic, geological, or topographical conditions exist that necessitate all but administrative local amendments.

 

The proposed local modifications to the Building Regulations continue to include modifications to the State Building Code that establish a Building Safety Score standard for Fire Sprinkler requirements, and that revise and supplement the definitions provided in the State Building Code. Findings of fact are required for these substantive, non-administrative changes to the requirements of the State Building Code.  All other amendments to the current Building Regulations are non-substantive in that they simply cite the requirements of the new code, and do not require any particular findings of fact.

 

 

 

A.                     PROPOSED LOCAL AMENDMENTS

                     

                     Each of the local amendments below includes discussion in the following four areas: (1) Proposed Amendment Summary; (2) Finding(s); (3) Local Conditions and Impacts; and (4) Recommendations and Proposed County Code Text.

                     

                     1.                     Definitions and Modifications to Existing Fire Sprinkler                      Requirements

 

a.                     Proposed Amendment Summary

 

Pursuant to State law, the Board of Supervisors of San Mateo County, in its ordinance amending the 2019 California Building Standards Code, amends provisions of the California Building Standards Code related to the regulation of the life, health and safety of building occupants. Specifically such amendments include: Definitions to include (1) Accessory Structure, (2) Bedroom and/or Sleeping Room, (3) Driveway, (4) Habitable Space, and (5) Kitchen; Plastic plumbing, when used within structures, is limited to single family and two family residences; Existing structures, with specific exceptions, must install Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems. These amendments are discussed as a group because they are all safety related and are all affected by the same local conditions.

 

b.                     Finding

Pursuant to State law, including, but not limited to, Sections 13143.5, 18941.5, 17958.5 and 17958.7 of the California Health and Safety Code, the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors finds that the above changes or modifications are reasonably necessary because of certain local climatic, geological and topographic conditions as described below which create situations which can and do result in uncontrollable fire situations which can and do result in harm and danger to life and property in the community.

All of the proposed safety related amendments help protect structures and firefighters during a fire. The ability to identify and determine what an accessory structure and/or bedroom/sleeping room is as well as what is considered habitable space helps reduce the incidence of death in the event of a fire. Fire sprinklers help suppress fires inside of a building and a Driveway meeting minimum standards allows firefighters to more readily access structures in an emergency.

c.                     Local Conditions

The following local conditions make the above amendments necessary to the California Building Standards Code in order to provide a reasonable degree of fire and life safety in San Mateo County.

CLIMATIC

Precipitation and Relative Humidity

Precipitation, in normal years, can range from 15 to 24 inches per year with an average of approximately 20 inches per year. Ninety-six percent (96%) falls during the months of October through April and four percent (4%) from May through September. This is a dry period of at least five months each year. Additionally, the area is subject to frequent periods of drought - indeed, the area recently suffered through an unprecedented seven-year drought. May 2001 was also rated as the fifth driest May in California records; 2001 also experienced the 17th driest November-February, the 16th driest November-March, the 24th driest October-May, and the 23rd driest June-May periods. Similar periods of continued drought may be expected locally in the future.

Relative humidity remains in the middle range most of the time.  It ranges from 45 to 65 percent in the winter.  It occasionally falls as low as 15 percent.

Impact

The average rainfall in the County is frequently surpassed by concentrated periods of heavy rainfall.  These factors, combined with soil types, terrain and existing road systems, have led to landslides and flooding across the State, the County, and private road systems. The blockage of access routes delays or prevents the ability of fire apparatus to respond to the scene of an emergency.

During 1982 and again in 1998, these conditions resulted in closures of Highway 1 in the Devil’s Slide area, Highway 84 in the La Honda area, and Pescadero Road in the Pescadero area for extended periods.  Many other County-maintained roads also experience landslides, resulting in closures, or limited traffic capabilities for fire apparatus.  Although roads known to be susceptible to closure have been identified by Caltrans and the County, clearing of these routes is dependent upon knowledge and availability of resources.  Thus, a road closure could delay or prevent firefighter access during a critical period.

Following past rains, partial or complete road blockages occurred on Tunitas Creek Road, Bear Gulch West, Oak Knoll, Springdale, Glenloch Way, Alpine Road, Cloverdale, and Pescadero Road.

Temperatures

Temperatures from June through September average above 80º F in some parts of the County.  Temperatures as high as 110º F have been recorded, and it is not unusual to experience several continuous days with temperatures in the mid to high 90s. These extended periods occurred in July 1988, July 1990, October 1991 and in August and September 1998.

Impact

High temperatures cause rapid fatigue and heat exhaustion of fire-fighters, thereby reducing their effectiveness and ability to control large wildland fires, which can endanger buildings, or large fires involving either interiors or exteriors of buildings.  This limited ability results in losses of buildings without automatic fire protection systems.

Local high temperatures occasionally cause loss of electrical power in all or portions of communities within the County due to overloading from air conditioning equipment or other temperature-related stresses on the electrical utilities.  Water storage and delivery systems within the County depend primarily or entirely upon electrical power for both domestic and fire flow delivery.  Extended periods of power loss reduce the amount of storage available for suppression of wildland and structural fires.

Another impact from high temperatures is that combustible building materials and non-irrigated weeds, grass and brush are preheated, thus causing these materials to ignite more readily and burn more rapidly and intensely.  Additionally, the atmosphere surrounding the materials being of a higher temperature reduces the effectiveness of the water being applied to the burning materials.  This requires that more water be more effectively applied, which in turn requires more fire department resources in order to control a fire on a hot day.  High temperatures directly contribute to the rapid growth of fires to an intensity and magnitude beyond the control capabilities of the fire departments.

Winds

Prevailing winds in the area are from the west.  However, winds are experienced from virtually every direction at one time or another.  Velocities are generally in the 12 miles per hour (MPH) range, gusting to 25 to 35 MPH.  Forty (40) MPH winds are experienced and winds up to 55 MPH have been registered locally.

Impacts

Winds such as those experienced locally can and do cause fires (interior and exterior) to burn and spread rapidly.  Fires involving non-irrigated weeds, grass and brush can grow to a magnitude and be fanned to an intensity beyond the control capabilities of the fire department very quickly, even by relatively moderate winds.  When such fires are not controlled, they can extend to nearby buildings, particularly those with untreated wood shake or shingle roofs.

Local winds frequently cause damage to electrical transmission lines which then arc, spark and/or break.  This can start fires on untreated wood shake or shingle roofs or in dry vegetation, which can spread to nearby untreated wood shake or shingle roofs.  Additionally, when power lines are broken by winds, they can result in power outages in large portions of the County.

Local winds frequently cause the breakage of limbs and branches of trees.  It is not unusual for local winds to cause trees to fall.  In many instances, damage occurs in trees adjacent to electrical transmission and distribution lines.  During December 1997, these winds caused broken tree limbs to break power lines, resulting in fires.  In 1998, the fire in Frenchman’s Creek burned approximately 35 acres.  The fire burning concurrently in Tunitas Creek burned more than 45 acres of grass, brush, and timbered areas, and resulted in the destruction of a year-round dwelling and another structure.

When interior building fires break open windows, winds can cause smoke and fire to quickly spread to other portions of the building via interior and exterior openings.  An interior blowtorch effect can be created by wind when windows on more than one side of the building are open.  When an interior fire ventilates through the roof of a building, regardless of the type of roof construction, sparks and embers from the fire are carried by winds to other roofs and to dry weeds, grass and brush, thereby starting additional fires.

Winds of the type experienced locally also reduce the effectiveness of exterior water streams used by the fire department on fires involving interior areas of buildings. Local winds will continue to be a definite factor toward causing major fire losses to buildings not provided with automatic fire sprinkler systems. National statistics frequently cite wind conditions such as those experienced locally as a major factor where conflagrations have occurred.

GEOLOGICAL

Seismicity

The majority of the County encompasses areas classified as Seismic Design Category E, which is the most severe earthquake category. Buildings and other structures in Category E can experience major seismic damage. Within San Mateo County are active faults such as San Andreas, San Gregorio, Seal Cove, and other lesser faults. Earthquake activity with nearby epicenters have the potential for the following impacts.

Impact

A major earthquake could result in the cutting-off of response routes of fire companies by collapsing buildings, overpasses and bridges throughout the County.

Earthquakes of the magnitude experienced locally can cause major damage to electrical transmission facilities, which in turn cause power failures while at the same time starting fires throughout the County.  The occurrence of multiple fires will quickly disperse existing fire department resources, thereby reducing and/or delaying their response to any given fire.

Even minor seismic activity has an adverse impact on fire protection. Any earth movement, which causes buildings to move, creates cracking and warping of fire walls, smoke barriers, door frames, etc., thereby negating the effectiveness of these structural elements which are intended to prevent fire and smoke from spreading throughout a building.

Soils

The area is replete with various soils which are unstable, clay loam and alluvial fans being predominant.  These soil conditions are moderately to severely prone to swelling and shrinking, and are plastic and tend to liquefy, depending upon moisture content.

Impact

The swelling, shrinking, shifting and settling of local soils cause shifting and warping of buildings built upon them. As noted above, any earth movement, which causes buildings to move, creates cracking and warping of fire walls, smoke barriers, door frames, etc., thereby negating the effectiveness of structural elements intended to prevent fire and smoke from spreading throughout a building.

Additionally, these soils are susceptible to seismic shock and moisture concentrations. This may result in landslides in hilly and creek side areas, which often exceed 30 percent slopes and can obstruct roads used for response by the fire department. Such restriction of response routes can result in major fire losses in locations where these structures have no automatic fire protection systems such as sprinklers.

TOPOGRAPHIC

Vegetation

Highly combustible dry grass, weeds and brush are common in the hilly and open space areas adjacent to built-up locations six to eight months of each year. When these areas experience wildland fires, they immediately threaten nearby buildings. This condition can be found throughout the County, especially in those developed and developing areas of the County, which interface and intermix with adjoining wildlands.

Examples of fires of this type include the San Mateo Highlands in 1988, Devonshire Canyon in 1990, and Palomar Park in 1991.  On the morning of October 16, 1991, a structure fire occurred on Sylvan Way in Emerald Lakes Hills. The fire quickly spread to adjacent trees and vegetation, and debris and ash fell into unburned vegetation and onto adjacent structures in an area more than 400 feet around the fire. The morning fog, which cleared during suppression activities, contributed to the lack of fire spread in the vegetation. An undetected ember landed in an abandoned redwood septic tank approximately 175 feet from the fire, and smoldered for nearly twelve hours before breaking into open flame and spreading to surrounding grasses.

Impact

Fire involving large areas of dry vegetation can quickly grow to a magnitude beyond the control capabilities of a fire department. When such a situation occurs, fire department resources may not be able to prevent major fire losses in locations with such conditions.

Surface Features

The arrangement and location of natural and man-made surface features, including hills, creeks, highways, housing tracts, individual dwelling units, commercial development, open space areas, streets and roads, combine to limit feasible response routes for fire department resources in and to County areas.

Impact

The limited number of response routes and lack of feasible alternate routes subject responding fire department units to significant delays in arriving at fires. As the community and environs continue to grow without compensating increases in traffic arterials, traffic congestion becomes correspondingly worse. Delays result in an insufficient number of fire department resources arriving early to effectively control fires involving buildings with interiors not having automatic fire protection systems.  The result can be serious fire losses at such buildings.

Additional delays including total blockage of existing access routes must be anticipated particularly where they traverse the hilly areas serving many communities. These delays result from a combination of residents attempting to flee or enter the fire area and spectators driving and/or parking along normal or alternate access roads. Fire damage from these delays and complete inability to reach fire scenes by fire apparatus is intensified and results in the need for additional suppression resources to obtain control.

Buildings, Landscaping and Terrain

Many of the new buildings and building complexes have building and landscaping features and designs, which preclude or greatly limit any approach or operational access to their exteriors by fire department vehicles. There are many buildings to which access by firefighting personnel to all but one side is made virtually impossible due to landscaping, fences, slopes or other buildings.

Impact

When fire department vehicles and personnel cannot gain access to the exteriors of buildings involved with fire, it becomes necessary to conduct all extinguishing and ventilating operations via the interior. It also requires that equipment must be carried for long distances from fire vehicles to the fire location. Such operations quickly exhaust fire personnel both in numbers and in stamina.  Access problems often result in severely delaying, misdirecting or making impossible fire and smoke control efforts such as locating the seat of the fire, applying hose streams and locating and opening windows or roofs for ventilation. This can result in extensive heat, smoke and water damage in much of the building not originally involved in the fire. Access problems increase the potential for, and numbers of, injuries sustained by firefighting personnel.

The combination of buildings without fire sprinkler systems located in close proximity to each other, and with impeded access for the fire department, can readily result in multiple building fires and major fire losses.

Electrical Power Transmission Equipment

Above-ground electrical power transmission lines suspended on poles and towers exist throughout the County. Many power line poles are located adjacent to streets and roads and many of the transmission wires are suspended above large areas of dry vegetation and near untreated wood shake or shingle roofs. Most of the electrical power provided within the County is supplied via above-ground facilities.

Impact

Above-ground electrical power transmission lines are subject to damage from overloading, winds, trees, earthquakes and collisions from motor vehicles and aircraft.

When damaged, these facilities often start fires involving dry vegetation from the resultant arcing and sparking. Frequently, such damage results in numerous fires being started simultaneously, thereby quickly dispersing available fire department forces. This in turn results in delayed and/or limited response by the fire department to any given fire, thereby causing excessive fire damage due to limited fire department capacity.

Damaged electrical lines often fall onto streets, thereby obstructing response routes from fire stations to fire locations, which again results in excessive fire damage due to limited and/or delayed response by the fire department.

Also, damage to electrical transmission lines frequently results in large areas of the community being without power for extended periods of time. Unless a building involved in a fire located in a powerless area has its own automatic fire alarm system containing an emergency power supply or fire sprinkler system, fire can result in major damage and possible loss of life.

Additionally, the existence of above-ground electrical transmission poles and lines along streets and near buildings often results in partial to complete obstruction of exterior operations and access to the building by fire department aerial apparatus. This again limits the effectiveness and capabilities of the fire department and contributes to extensive fire losses.

d.                     Recommendations and Proposed County Code Language

The Planning and Building Department recommends the following amendments to the California Building Standards Code because they are necessary to mitigate the above-described impacts, which are caused by local climatic, geological and topographic conditions.

Definitions: Accessory Structure, Bedroom/Sleeping Room, Driveway, Habitable Space, and Kitchen

This proposed amendment would allow the County to clearly define features of a project within the unincorporated area of San Mateo County.

State Code Provisions, Section 202 - Definitions

The State has only defined Habitable Space and a Kitchen in previous code cycles.

Proposed Provision, San Mateo County Ordinance Code, Division VII, Chapter 2, Article 1, Section 9102 and Chapter 2, Article 2, Section 9112

1.                     The following requirements shall apply to all new buildings                      or structures and existing buildings or structures undergoing                      modifications as permitted by San Mateo County.

a.                     A detached structure or building that is accessory to and incidental to that of the main structure and that is located on the same lot shall be classified as an accessory structure.

b.                     A room used for sleeping purposes shall have a minimum floor area of seventy (70) square feet and shall be not less than seven (7) feet in any direction. A study, sewing room, sitting room, office, den, or similar room shall be considered a bedroom/sleeping room if it contains a closet, alcove, indentation, or wing wall which creates an area greater than eighteen (18) inches in depth.

c.                     A space in a building for living, sleeping, eating, or cooking. Bathrooms, toilet rooms, closets, halls, storage or utility spaces and similar areas are not considered habitable spaces. An accessory structure containing a bathroom, where the bathroom is larger than four (4) feet six (6) inches by four (4) foot six (6) inches and/or contains more than a single water closet and/or a single lavatory, on a residential property, shall be considered Habitable Space.

d.                     Any room or space used, intended, or designated to be used for cooking and preparing of food. Rooms which contain appliances or equipment such as microwave ovens, gas or electric cook tops or ovens, toaster ovens and similar appliances shall constitute a room or area, intended or designated as a kitchen.

2.                     The following requirements shall apply to all new buildings or structures as permitted by San Mateo County.

a.                     A vehicular access that serves no more than two (2) buildings, with no more than three dwelling units on a single parcel, and any number of accessory buildings shall be considered a driveway. New driveways serving one (1) and two (2) family dwellings shall be constructed to the following minimum standards:

i.                     A minimum of 6 inches of compacted Class II base rock and 3 inches of asphaltic concrete, for slopes up to 15%.

ii.                     Slopes between 15% and 20% shall have an engineered surface such as rough, grooved concrete.

iii.                     Slopes shall not exceed 20%.

iv.                     A minimum unobstructed width of a 12 foot traffic lane and sixteen 16 feet unobstructed horizontal clearance.

Fire Sprinkler Requirement Modifications

This proposed amendment would require that automatic fire extinguishing systems be provided in existing structures, with specific exceptions.

The primary proposed modification to the existing fire sprinkler requirements is that the current requirement for installation of fire sprinklers in existing buildings is based on a valuation criteria. In order to eliminate arbitrary valuations of projects a “Building Safety Score”, taken from the prior model code language, as modified by San Mateo County, is proposed. The “Building Safety Score” sets clearly defined criteria to be used in the assessment of a projects need for fire sprinkler installation.

State Code Provisions, Section 903.2. Automatic Sprinkler Systems - Minimum Requirements

Section 903.2 requires the installation of automatic fire sprinkler systems in all new buildings and structures.

Proposed Provision, San Mateo County Ordinance Code, Division VII, Chapter 2, Article 1, Section 9105; Chapter 2, Article 2, Section 9113; and Chapter 2, Article 3, Section 9135

1.                     The following proposed requirements shall apply to all                      existing buildings or structures that require a building permit                      issued by San Mateo County.

a.                     All existing one- and two-family dwellings, buildings and/or structures shall be provided with an automatic fire sprinkler system when any of the following conditions occur:

1.                     Where a Building Safety Score, as calculated per item A, is less than 17.

A.                     Residential Building Safety Score Equation

1.                     Stories = (Number of allowed stories = 3) - (Proposed stories) x 7 (Construction factor) = X

2.                     Area equation = (Allowable area = 3,600) - (proposed area) x .005 = Y

3.                     X + Y = Building Safety Score

4.                     Minimum score = 17 (Scores below 17 require automatic sprinkler systems)

5.                     Fire Hazard Severity Zone: LRA & SRA Adjustment (- 5)

6.                     1 Hour rated construction in addition (+5)

2.                     Alterations that create additional bedrooms as defined herein, greater than four (4), within the existing conditioned space.

3.                     Additions and or alterations that create a two-family dwelling where a one-family dwelling existed.

4.                     Automatic sprinklers shall be installed in any one- and two-family garage, carport or breezeway attached to any structure for which an automatic sprinkler system is required.  A detached one and two-family garage, not containing any habitable space, 1,000 square feet or more shall require the installation of an NFPA-13D automatic fire sprinkler system.

5.                     The addition of a second story to a one- or two-family dwelling, where a second story did not previously exist, regardless of a Building Safety Score result.

6.                     Additions, alterations or modifications to any existing structure containing automatic fire sprinklers shall require the extension or modification of the fire sprinkler system throughout the added, altered, or modified areas.

Plans for the installation, extension or modification of an automatic fire sprinkler system shall be submitted to the Planning and Building Department of San Mateo County for review and approval by the appropriate fire agency. Additions, alterations, and/or remodels to an existing dwelling previously equipped with automatic fire sprinklers shall require the submittal of five sets of sprinkler plans and three sets of hydraulic calculations. All components of the existing system shall be submitted for review in order to determine compliance with the applicable standards.

7.                     All automatic fire sprinkler systems shall comply with the currently enforced edition of NFPA-13, NFPA-13D, NFPA-13R and any additional County specifications, or modifications imposed by supplemental rules and regulations adopted by the County of San Mateo.

8.                     The installation of an automatic fire sprinkler system may be required by the Building Official when an alteration, addition or change in use or occupancy of a building or portion of a building thereof increases the hazard of fire or threat to life and safety.

9.                     The requirements of this section are intended to represent minimum standards for construction. Nothing in this section shall prohibit the voluntary installation of automatic fire sprinkler systems.

B.                     PROPOSED ADMINISTRATIVE AMENDMENTS

In addition to the adoption of the California Building Standards Code with the above-proposed local amendments, the proposed ordinance also re-adopts San Mateo County Ordinance Code, Division VII and several sections of the San Mateo County administrative codes. Unlike building codes, findings of fact are not required for the adoption of administrative codes. These administrative codes address matters such as permit requirements, application procedures, the number of plan sets required, permit term limits, and similar procedures. The proposed adoption and/or amendments to the San Mateo County administrative codes include the following topics: (1) adopting the 2019 California Building Standards Code, California Building Code, Section 9100); (2) adopting California Residential Code, Section 9110; (3) adopting California Fire Code, Section 9120; (4) adopting California Historical Building Code, Section 9150; (5) adopting California Existing Building Code, Section 9160; (6) adopting California Mechanical Code, Section 9170; (7) adopting California Electrical Code, Section 9180; (8) adopting California Plumbing Code, Section 9190; (9) adopting California Energy Code, Section 9200; (10) adopting California Green Building Standards Code, Section 9210; adopting International Property Maintenance Code, Section 9220.

1.                     Adoption of the California Building Code, Residential Code, Fire Code, Historical Building Code, Existing Building Code, Mechanical Code, Electrical Code, Plumbing Code, Energy Code, Green Building Standards Code, and International Property Maintenance Code.

a.                     Proposed Amendments

These sections adopt the latest editions of the Construction Codes with referenced appendices.

b.                     As stated previously, new editions of the Construction Codes have been adopted in this triennial edition of the California Building Standards Code. In order to effectively administer the County Ordinance Code and the California Building Standards Code, it is necessary for the County to specifically adopt these latest editions, with local amendments as noted in this report.

c.                     Proposed Ordinance Code Language

Division VII. Chapter 2. Adoption of 2019 California Building Standards Code. The latest adopted editions of the 2019 California Building Standards Code, Title 24, excluding California Administrative Code, Title 24, Part 1 and including the 2019 California Building Code, Title 24, Part 2; 2019 California Residential Code, Title 24, Part 2.5; 2019 California Fire Code, Title 24, Part 9; 2019 California Historical Building Code, Title 24, Part 8; 2019 California Existing Building Code, Title 24, Part 10; 2019 California Mechanical Code, Title 24, Part 4; 2019 California Electrical Code, Title 24, Part 3; 2019 California Plumbing Code, Title 24, Part 5; 2019 California Energy Code, Title 24, Part 6; 2019 California Green Building Standards Code, Title 24, Part 11; 2018 International Property Maintenance Code; 2019 California Reference Standards Code, Title 24, Part 12; are hereby adopted by reference except as otherwise provided in Division VII, as the Building Code of the County of San Mateo. A copy of the “California Building Standards Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

The mandatory requirements of the adopted appendices to the California Building Standards Code shall be enforceable to the same extent as if contained in the body of the Building Code. Any amendments, errata and/or emergency supplements to this code shall be enforceable to the same extent as if contained in the body of the “California Building Standards Code.”

Section 9100.  Adoption of 2019 California Building Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Building Code, Title 24, Part 1, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Part 1 of Division II, appendices G through J and Appendix M within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Building Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9120.  Adoption of 2019 California Residential Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Residential Code, Title 24, Part 2.5, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Division II within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Residential Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9130.  Adoption of 2019 California Fire Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Fire Code, Title 24, Part 9, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Sections 305, 307, 308, 311, appendices B, C, D, K, I, and N within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Fire Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9150.  Adoption of 2019 California Historical Building Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Historical Building Code, Title 24, Part 8, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Historical Building Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9160.  Adoption of 2019 California Existing Building Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Existing Building Code, Title 24, Part 10, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Part 1 of Division II, within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Existing Building Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9170.  Adoption of 2019 California Mechanical Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Mechanical Code, Title 24, Part 4, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Part 1 of Division II, appendices B through D and Appendices F and G, within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Mechanical Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9180.  Adoption of 2019 California Electrical Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Electrical Code, Title 24, Part 3, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Annexes A through J, within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Electrical Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9190.  Adoption of 2019 California Plumbing Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Plumbing Code, Title 24, Part 5, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference. In addition, Part 1 of Division II, appendices G through J and Appendix M within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Plumbing Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9200.  Adoption of 2019 California Energy Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Energy Code, Title 24, Part 6, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Energy Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9210.  Adoption of 2019 California Green Building Standards Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2019 California Green Building Standards Code, Title 24, Part 11, is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “California Green Building Standards Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

Section 9220.  Adoption of 2018 International Property Maintenance Code.  The latest adopted edition of the 2018 International Property Maintenance Code is hereby adopted and incorporated by reference within the referenced standard above and all amendments, errata, and/or emergency supplements are also adopted during this triennial California Building Standards Code cycle. A copy of the “International Property Maintenance Code” is on file at the San Mateo County Building Inspection Section.

County Counsel has reviewed and approved the Ordinance as to form.

FISCAL IMPACT:

None

 

ATTACHMENT:

A.                     Recommended Findings and Action